Technologies

Displaying technologies 241 - 247 of 247 in total

Use of Visible Light Photopolymerization for Amplification and Detection of a Molecular Recognition Event

A research team led by Dr. Christopher Bowman of the University of Colorado has developed an improved method of detecting molecular recognition events for applications that prioritize low cost and minimization of reliance on instrumentation and skilled labor for assay performance and data interpretation. This method does not require the use of enzymes, and is particularly useful for cases where there are a relatively small number of molecular recognition events in complex analyte solutions. The methods of this invention are based on amplification of the signal due to each molecular recognition event, rather than amplification of the number of molecular recognition events taking place. The amplification is achieved through photopolymerization, with the polymer formed being associated with the molecular recognition event. This technology can limit or eliminate the need for techniques which increase the number of recognition events taking place, including PCR and techniques involving the culturing of bacteria, as well as RT-PCR techniques for microarray applications as a means to achieve acceptable signals. 

University of Colorado at Boulder logo

University of Colorado at Boulder

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Determining the Pore Size and Pore-Size Distribution of Porous Materials Such as Polymeric Membranes

A research team from the University of Colorado led by Alan Greenberg has developed a method for the determination of PSD in a porous material called evapoporometry (EP). This method is capable of determining pore sizes from approximately the nanometer scale up to the micron scale. EP determines the pore size based on the evaporative mass loss at constant temperature from porous materials that have been pre-saturated with either a wetting or non-wetting volatile liquid. The saturated porous material is placed in an appropriate test cell on a conventional microbalance to measure liquid mass loss at a constant temperature as a function of time. The mass-loss rate is then related to the PSD. This permits the mass to be measured as a function of time. The slope of the mass versus time curve is the evaporation rate. The evaporation rate is related to the vapor pressure at the interface between the liquid in the porous material and the ambient gas phase. The vapor pressure in turn is related to the pore diameter. 

University of Colorado at Boulder logo

University of Colorado at Boulder

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Detection Of Molecular Recognition Without The Use Of Instrumentation: Photopolymerization Of Macroscopically Thick Films Following A Recognition Event

A research team led by Dr. Christopher Bowman of the University of Colorado has developed an improved method of detecting molecular recognition events for applications that prioritize low cost and minimization of reliance on instrumentation and skilled labor for assay performance and data interpretation. This method does not require the use of enzymes, and is particularly useful for cases where there are a relatively small number of molecular recognition events in complex analyte solutions. The methods of this invention are based on amplification of the signal due to each molecular recognition event, rather than amplification of the number of molecular recognition events taking place. The amplification is achieved through photopolymerization, with the polymer formed being associated with the molecular recognition event. This technology can limit or eliminate the need for techniques which increase the number of recognition events taking place, including PCR and techniques involving the culturing of bacteria, as well as RT-PCR techniques for microarray applications as a means to achieve acceptable signals. 

University of Colorado at Boulder logo

University of Colorado at Boulder

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Doxazolidine, Doxazolidine Derivatives, and Targeted Doxazolidines for the Treatment of Cancer

Doxazolidine (Doxaz) is a formaldehyde conjugate of Dox developed by Dr. Tad Koch of the University of Colorado. Doxaz is functionally distinct from Dox and induces cancer cell death in sensitive and multidrug resistant cells by crosslinking DNA (a different mechanism than Dox). Due to its increased toxicity and instability, Doxaz is an ideal candidate for prodrug delivery. Dr. Koch has designed a series of prodrugs for the targeted delivery of Doxaz to cancers, including the three lead compounds Pentyl PABC Doxaz (PPD), GaFK-Doxaz (a peptidyl prodruc of Doxaz), and PPD-EMCH. These promising leads are covered by a portfolio of issued and pending patents, all of which are currently available for license. PPD is activated to Doxaz by the cytosolic and microsomal protein carboxylesterase 2 (CES2) expressed by liver, non-small cell lung, colon, pancreatic, renal, and thyroid cancer cells. Preclinical work with PPD has supported an improved safety and efficacy profile: PPD-induced inhibition of tumor growth followed dose escalation and exceeded inhibition of tumor growth by doxorubicin near its maximum tolerated dose. Heart sections treated with PPD showed significantly less evidence of cardiotoxicity than heart sections treated with Dox. Unlike Dox, PPD is potentially orally bioavailable. 

University of Colorado at Boulder logo

University of Colorado at Boulder

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Simple, compact and robust optical reference system for lasers with narrow linewidth

CU/JILA researchers Mark Notcutt, John L. Hall and Long-Sheng Ma have constructed an improved mounting configuration for a passive optical cavity used for laser frequency stabilization. In this configuration, vertical suspension about the geometrical midplane leads to a common-mode rejection of vertical accelerations. The associated reduction of the vibration sensitivity of the effective cavity length has led to a simple and compact reference cavity system for laser stabilization at the level of 1 Hz linewidth. 

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University of Colorado at Boulder

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mproved Methods for Identification of Peptide Sequences

The recent introduction of multidimensional chromatography linked to a mass spectrometer (MS) provides unprecedented ability to analyze proteins in complex samples, such as cell lysates which may contain thousands of proteins (proteomic profiling). This involves separation of the sample into many fractions and, when combined with the fast data acquisition rate of modern MS instruments, produces an immense amount of data (e.g. typical data acquisition is 2000 peptide spectra/hour and one instrument can produce a terabyte of data in less than a year). Automated methods for processing this large dataflow are required. A major limitation is the lack of sensitivity and specificity of the automated search programs that take MS information about the peptide ions and search the protein database in order to identify the peptide sequence. This technology is a novel set of integrated methods for processing protein databases to improve identification peptide sequences and for improved confidence scoring. The system yields higher specificity and sensitivity than all currently available search programs and is computationally efficient that improves high-through put data analysis of complex samples. 

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University of Colorado at Boulder

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Description of a Full B. Subtilis Primasome Dependent Replication System

Reconstituted bacterial replication assemblies and methods for their use are provided .

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University of Colorado at Boulder

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